DANI TRIBE

The Dani overwhelmingly a pork and sweet potato peoples, something like 90 percents of their diet is sweet potato , steamed or baked. The other 10 percent is made up of great variety of food, almost all of which grow them selves.

HISTORY DANI TRIBE

In 1921 an expedition team lead by John Krenter, had climbed mountain present time called Mandala mountain. At the time, the expedition team walked on foot and crossed Baliem river. An odd event happened at that time, the expedition team could not see Baliem Valley, this was caused by cloud and dense fog hinder their sight. Krenter expedition stayed some days at swart Valley ( Karubaga resort).

According to the investigations which held by Dr. Paul Wirz (Anthropologist), he wrote some books once among them is “Di Tanah Uang Kulitbia”, at that time, people in the interior areas had recognized for the first time. The first time in 1938 Baliem area a tapped  by Arch bold team expedition.

Mr. Richard Bold is a scientist from America Museum of natural history, he intended to explore plants and interior area. Bold recognized Baliem Valley from aero plane on June 21’1938. the investigations in the Baliem Valley began on June 1938 to May 13’1939 at that time. The expedition planed landed at Arch bold lake. The both of group walked on foot, and meet each other in Baliem river.

The first meeting with Baliem inhabitants in July 31’1939, this meeting was welcomed by arrows, spears. The aim of Arcold expedition was to investigated flora, fauna. After investigating they left butary of Baliem river. In 1945 the second World War still going on, an airplane carried American forces on a trip to see Baliem area from above. But, unfortunately airplane fell down in the pass valley.

Twenty one passengers were died, and three of them still alive, a girl name Margareth Hasting. (SAR) Search and Rescue teal try to find the passengers, they brought them medicine, food stuff. Beside that they built temporary airstrip specially for a kind of pale without machine. Miss. Margareth and 2 men were discovered on May 30’1945, then they took an airplane to their home town.

LIFESTYLE DANI TRIBE

The Dani overwhelmingly a pork and sweet potato peoples, something like 90 percents of their diet is sweet potato , steamed or baked. The other 10 percent is made up of great variety of food, almost all of which grow them selves. Most of their meat they eat from domestic pigs, which killed only at ceremonial occasions. But there are enough pig for ceremony, so that most people get few ounces of pork of every week or so.

There are other minor root crops like taro and yam, there are lot of bananas plants around every compound, but the fruit takes so long to mature at this altitude that bananas is not an important food. People grow sugar cane and cucumber for snacks, and plenty of greens are used in the steam bundies, sweet potato leaves, especially, but also various other leaves which ethnographers always called : spinach-like.

If there is a delicacy. It would be the various sots of pandanus. One kind has a great long red fruit which is steamed and squeezed out to make a strong red paste which flavors other foods, another kind of pandanus tree bear nut, these are baked, the tough shells smashed open, and the savory little meat picked out and taken.

The Dani are certainly not gourmets, there is little variety cooking or in menu. The only seasoning are the red pandanus paste, ginger roots or salts. The interest or importance of food for the Danis lies not in the ingenuity of the recipe of the elegance of the service, but in the meaning of the gathering. Ceremonies of all sorts involve cooking massed of simple food to eat and take away.

Although most Dani will grabe a handful of berries to much on, and boys often take potshots at birds, hunting and gathering is now almost inconsequential in providing food. A few men who like hunting live at the edge of the forest, keep dogs and go after marsupials but most do not bother. Children sometimes catch crayfish but until the Dutch stocking ponds and stream in the 1960s. there are no fish at all in the Grand Valley water.

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